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's happened over the last couple of weeks. but going over the fiscal cliff is serious business. and i'm here seriously trying to resolve it. and i would hope the white house would get serious, as well. >> all right. so once again, here are the cliff notes right here. republicans on the hill are demanding trillions of dollars worth of debt reduction. that's pretty much fine with democrats who say the wealthy should foot the bill in the form of higher tax rates. and therein lies the catch because the republicans want the savings of federal spending cuts. that dispute blocking efforts to keep rates from rising on everyone. as scheduled on january 1st. this is a so-called fiscal cliff. january 1st. our news makers representative jim clyburn of south carolina, number three democrat in the house of representatives and number one i'm sure to a lot of people. hello. how are you? >> hey, don. thank you so much for having me. >> thanks for coming on. is speaker boehner right, though? as the clock is ticking, ticking toward january 1st, the talks haven't progressed in two weeks. is he right? >> well, i
the fiscal cliff is serious business. and i'm here seriously trying to resolve it. and i would hope the white house would get serious as well. >> speaker boehner made very clear at his press conference that he thinks the ball is in your court and the president's court. he says democrats have got to get series about spending cuts. where is the disconnect? >> i don't understand his brain so you should ask him. okay? >> reid making those comments to our own kate bolduan. i'm joined by dan lothian. dan, we're learning more about the white house plan to deal with the fiscal cliff. break it down for us. >> reporter: right. this is the plan that secretary -- treasury secretary timothy geithner took up to capitol hill yesterday. it calls for $1.6 trillion in tax increases over a ten-year period more than republicans had anticipated. in addition to that, $400 billion in spending cuts that will come later. much of that not really specified. we're looking at entitlements such as medicare. and then the plan also includes $50 billion in stimulus spending. democrats see this really as sort of the opening s
to pennsylvania to visit a small business today to talk about the fiscal cliff. unfortunately, the president and members of his own party who were proposing that we let many small businesses -- as in hundreds of thousands of them -- go over the fiscal cliff. simply put, that's why we don't have an agreement as yet. they said yesterday, this is not a game. i used to be a small business owner. small business owners are regular men and women from all backgrounds who, in today's economy, are facing challenges on a daily basis. the president's tax increase would be another crippling blow for them while doing little to nothing to solve the bigger problem here, our national deficit and national debt. this debt doesn't exist because we don't tax small businesses enough, it exists because washington continues to spend too much and raising taxes on small businesses instead of taking a balanced approach that also cuts spending is wrong. it's only going to make it harder for our economy to grow and if our economy doesn't grow, americans don't get new jobs and the debt problem that we have will continue
is closely tracking all of this. the progress or lack of progress on the fiscal cliff talks and also wondering who is going to be the next treasury secretary. joining me steve rattner, wall street finance year, former head of president obama's auto task force. thanks for joining us, steve. first of all, what about the scenario that oh let's just let them go over the cliff and won't matter and the markets will view it as a nonevent. what do you think some. >> certainly going to matter. there's no question it's going to matter. it's going to matter to the markets. we don't know how much. this is an unprecedented situation, at least in my lifetime. we've had crises and debt ceilings and all that, but going over a cliff like this is a new one. the markets would be volatile, extremely -- a lot of downward pressure on them. and then the question would be how do businesses and consumers behave and quickly do they pull back? everyone knows the immediate impact from the government coming back and spending wouldn't be that great. the question then is how do businesses and consumers react? i do
in april, 2011. the last minute on the fiscal cliff -- i do not think it is a good way to do business. it seems to be the way we are doing business in this town. host: if we were to go over, what happens? guest: probably, congress would be back in session quickly and we would do something but i am talking about right now, hopefully, and continue to negotiate. it is not to question of dollars and cents. some people have said we could let the rates go up and the republicans could take something down and they could call that a tax cut. people would lose faith in the institution and political leadership. trust is a funny commodity. you have it until you do not. you do not get it back if you lose the trust and then do the right thing the next day. we should convince the country, the markets and the world that america can make smart decisions and tough compromises. this would be a step in the right direction of showing we can work together, and we could put the people first. we have differences and we could fight without putting them in harm's way. host: roger altman writes in "the financia
obama is reaching a deal on the fiscal cliff. just 31 days left until we hit those automatic spending cuts and tax increases, if negotiations break down. here is what president obama had to say in his weekly radio address. >> both parties say we should keep middle class taxes low. the senate has already passed a bill to keep income taxes from beginning up on middle class families. democrats in the house are ready to do the same thing. if we can just get a few house republicans onboard, i'll sign this bill as soon as congress sends it may way. but it's unacceptable for some republicans in congress to hold middle class tax cuts hostage simply because they refuse to let tax rates go up on the wealthiest americans. >> in the republican response, senator orrin hatch takes that hostage met foaphor one step further. >> unfortunately, some on the other side of the aisle are proposing a disastrous thelma and louise strategy, putting our already weak economy in further jeopardy. >> president obama says he wants to get a deal done by christmas, but both republicans and democrats will have to com
of this year. then, senator orrin hatch from utah gives the republican address on the fiscal cliff which refers to automatic tax increases and spending cuts that would go into effect in 2013. >> hi, everybody. i'm here on the factory floor of a business in hatfield, pennsylvania, where folks are working around the clock making toys to keep up with the christmas rush. and i came here because, back in washington, the clock is ticking on some important decisions that will have a real impact on our businesses - and on families like yours. the most pressing decision has to do with your taxes. see, at the end of the year, middle-class tax cuts are set to expire. and there are two things that can happen. first, if congress does nothing, every family will see their income taxes automatically go up at the beginning of next year. a typical middle class family of four will see their income taxes rise by $2,200. we can't let that happen. our families can't afford it, and neither can our economy. the second option is better. right now, congress can pass a law that would prevent a tax hike on the first $250,
disasters. we don't need to navigate the fiscal cliff. that will hurt the economy. when the economy is bad, less people travel commercially for leisure, less people send packages. it hurts us and again, razor thin profit margin, we need a good economy, we need the economy good overt long haul. it's good for business. >> gretchen: do you think they were actually listening to what you had to say? >> i think they were. >> gretchen: really? >> yeah. i think it was a good discussion because the business radio he said were talking about what the impact of going overt cliff would be and also with a it would be down the line. >> gretchen: but so much, nick, of what's been discussed in the press is only about increasing taxes. you just got done talking about the fact that a stool falls over unless you have the other legs there. did you get the sense in these insider talks that people are actually going to take on entitlement reform? >> i think behind the scenes talk, yes. right now there is a lot of public posturing going on and that, i think, i personally think that's a problem because in the nego
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8